Sermons from 2022

“You Hear That, Nana?”

Introduction A recent family reunion provided a welcome opportunity to reflect deeply on the seasons of life and what makes the Circle of Life so precious at every turn.

Revisiting “The Good Father”

This Father’s Day we’ll take a look back at some excerpts from one of our favorite past sermons by Rev. Dan Brosier titled, “The Good Father” with new perspective on what it means to be a “father who mothers” 15 years later.

Where is Our Village?

The saying “It Takes a Village” has always been a pillar of our spiritual community and a popular sentiment in American culture but lately it’s been difficult to feel the presence of a thriving interdependent village. This week, we’ll talk about what the idea of a village means to us, and how we can work to strengthen our chosen village moving forward.

A Literary Mothers’ Day

As we celebrate Mother’s Day, we’ll be exploring some fictional mothers that can serve as both role-models and surrogates (for those who’s mothers left something to be desired).

Theological Reflection

Our Unitarian Universalist 4th Principle calls for a “free and responsible search for truth and meaning”, but actually sitting down and contemplating our beliefs is not something many of us do on a regular basis. This morning we’ll be discussing the importance of theology (the study of religious truth, not just “God”) on our lives and on the future of humanity.

Holy Week

Holy Week takes on a bigger meaning when we consider that Easter, Passover, the Vernal Equinox, and Oestre have come together in a joyous surge of spirituality. Let’s take a look back through time and see how these religious observances became entwined.

“Cancelled”

In today’s age of “cancel culture”, who we are is being shaped by the whims of whichever political party is in power. What does this mean for our collective future when millions of children are growing up with only half the story?

Laughter During the Dark

“If I didn’t laugh, I’d cry.” So the saying goes. It’s true, that when we’re surrounded by the dark, humor is one of those precious things that helps us get through. Whether it’s gallows humor or silliness with no point other than to be silly, laughter really is “the best medicine.”